Between sacred and profane

Hanukkah is an excellent opportunity to delve into the art of stained glass, which was born hundreds of years ago as part of the religious architecture in the churches. Over time, the synagogues expanded and recently became more and more integrated into the interior design of residential buildings.

Nitza Aviram 

During the Hanukkah holiday, the children of the kindergarten return home with magnificent stained glass works of black Bristol and colored transparencies, which are glued to the windows so that the light will reflect through them. The dark winter days, when darkness descends early, and especially the days of Hanukkah with the glittering lights they spread around, are known as the great hour of stained glass.

The colorful stained-glass windows have been glorifying public buildings and prayer houses for centuries, perhaps because glass, more magical than any other material, reflects light in a unique way.

“On Hanukkah, stained glass has special significance because of its high regard for the light, and the stained glass on the windows of the house and in the chapels enhance the presence of light by combining the color glass, its reflection and the diffusion of light and color that creates a special atmosphere for the viewers,” explains Ronen Kimmel, Artist of stained glass.

In his studio, in Moshav Nir Israel near Ashkelon, he winks colorful pieces of glass, Scooping them around, inserting copper strips into the cut glass and connecting the pieces with a traditional soldering technique. “The method of preparing stained glass has been in existence for eight centuries, and decorative windows, pictures and lamps are produced in this technique.”

Stained glass and plenty

The art of glass is an international language and colorful stained glass works connect and connect between light and color. The stained glass is known as an element that softens the light that enters the interior and creates a warm and spiritual atmosphere. This is why the stained glass art is widespread in the prayer houses around the world, in a traditional religious architecture that uses decorative colored glass on the windows, ceilings and domes of the buildings. In addition, the use of stained glass gives the building a sense of abundance due to its ability to bring into the space maximum light.

Although the common use of stained glass is mainly in churches, many synagogues, in Israel and especially overseas, use stained glass art to glorify the hall. The stained glass is used mainly to tell the various biblical stories in symbols and color, to present the Seven Species, the Twelve Tribes and more.

Relax, even at homeKimmel, who has learned the healing theory through colors and the secrets of the effect of colors on our lives, takes care of the flow of soft and soothing colors as part of the way to tell the great stories of faith. “In the stained glass works I perform for synagogues, I take into account the influence of colors on the human soul, in order to achieve the effect of healing and relaxation during the stay in the chapel.”

In recent years, Kimmel says, more and more interior designers and private individuals have begun to discover the wonders of stained glass and make extensive use of colored glass in the design and design of private homes, in order to maximize the light and color within the living spaces. According to Kimmel, this is a good trend, since colors have a holistic effect on the human psyche, and the theory of color healing can be maximized through the integration of colored glass in our everyday spaces.

Between sacred and profane

Hanukkah is an excellent opportunity to delve into the art of stained glass, which was born hundreds of years ago as part of the religious architecture in the churches. Over time, the synagogues expanded and recently became more and more integrated into the interior design of residential buildings.

Nitza Aviram

During the Hanukkah holiday, the children of the kindergarten return home with magnificent stained glass works of black Bristol and colored transparencies, which are glued to the windows so that the light will reflect through them. The dark winter days, when darkness descends early, and especially the days of Hanukkah with the glittering lights they spread around, are known as the great hour of stained glass.

The colorful stained-glass windows have been glorifying public buildings and prayer houses for centuries, perhaps because glass, more magical than any other material, reflects light in a unique way.

“On Hanukkah, stained glass has special significance because of its high regard for the light, and the stained glass on the windows of the house and in the chapels enhance the presence of light by combining the color glass, its reflection and the diffusion of light and color that creates a special atmosphere for the viewers,” explains Ronen Kimmel, Artist of stained glass.

In his studio, in Moshav Nir Israel near Ashkelon, he winks colorful pieces of glass, Scooping them around, inserting copper strips into the cut glass and connecting the pieces with a traditional soldering technique. “The method of preparing stained glass has been in existence for eight centuries, and decorative windows, pictures and lamps are produced in this technique.”

Stained glass and plenty

The art of glass is an international language and colorful stained glass works connect and connect between light and color. The stained glass is known as an element that softens the light that enters the interior and creates a warm and spiritual atmosphere. This is why the stained glass art is widespread in the prayer houses around the world, in a traditional religious architecture that uses decorative colored glass on the windows, ceilings and domes of the buildings. In addition, the use of stained glass gives the building a sense of abundance due to its ability to bring into the space maximum light.

Although the common use of stained glass is mainly in churches, many synagogues, in Israel and especially overseas, use stained glass art to glorify the hall. The stained glass is used mainly to tell the various biblical stories in symbols and color, to present the Seven Species, the Twelve Tribes and more.

Relax, even at homeKimmel, who has learned the healing theory through colors and the secrets of the effect of colors on our lives, takes care of the flow of soft and soothing colors as part of the way to tell the great stories of faith. “In the stained glass works I perform for synagogues, I take into account the influence of colors on the human soul, in order to achieve the effect of healing and relaxation during the stay in the chapel.”

In recent years, Kimmel says, more and more interior designers and private individuals have begun to discover the wonders of stained glass and make extensive use of colored glass in the design and design of private homes, in order to maximize the light and color within the living spaces. According to Kimmel, this is a good trend, since colors have a holistic effect on the human psyche, and the theory of color healing can be maximized through the integration of colored glass in our everyday spaces.